My Weather

The Paul Hudson Weather Show

Paul Hudson in the BBC studio during the Weather Show

In the time I’ve worked at the BBC I’ve made programmes about American blues musicians performing in the former Soviet Union, young offenders being rehabilitated through the arts, Royal Navy convoys protecting NATO peace conferences. I’ve interviewed high profile recording artists, read news bulletins and reported live on breaking news stories. And whatever the inherent difficulties of these assignments were, they were at least tangible and there were facts - a story to tell.

FedEx Meteorologists Deliver… Rain or Shine

Depending on where you are in the world, the holiday season often delivers its own unwanted gift-rough weather.  It’s the kind of weather that doesn’t just cause your car to skid, rather shuts down roads, leaves you stranded at airports, disrupts large-scale global business, can cost billions of dollars in damages, and sadly, can even cost lives.

Storm Chasers

Cammie Czuchnicki, along with her boyfriend Tim, runs Weather Studios. They are both committed storm chasers and keen photographers – a mixture that creates some spectacular pictures. Cammie was awarded first place in the 2013 Royal Meteorological Society's South East annual photography competition. The winning photograph (above) is called 'Tornadic Supercell at night in Kansas: May 2012'. The image captures the last storm in a line of four during a memorable evening in Russell County, Kansas.

Weather for athletes: How the weather affects the lives of our athletes

As a sport that predominantly takes place outdoors, the link between athletics and weather is closer than most. Unlike in cricket or tennis rain very rarely stops play, in fact very little actually does. The conditions in which athletes can perform is shown by Colin Jackson's stories elsewhere on this website of chipping the ice from a single lane on a Welsh track in order to train on the frozen ground. Of course athletics is a summer sport, and this is unlikely to be seen at an event, but it illustrates the kind of conditions athletes can go about their business in.

(Fore)casting couch: David Lynch does the weather

When cult film director isn't messing with minds, he's quietly observing the weather


It may not be of much practical use unless you live in Los Angeles and you don’t have any windows, but that doesn’t prevent one particular web-based weather report from drawing thousands of people to the internet every day. And that’s because it happens to be the handiwork of cult film director David Lynch.