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Nothing is so simple that it cannot be misunderstood theWeather Club Thu, 15/03/2018 - 13:06

All enjoyable things must come to an end and so it is that I find myself thinking what to write about in my last article for theWeather Club.  Over the years I’ve covered all things hot to cold, calm to stormy, hurricanes to tornadoes, so I thought it was about time I wrote about communicating the weather, or the weather forecast to be more precise.  It’s all very good making an outstanding forecast, but if you cannot get the forecast across to the user of the information then to all intents and purposes it is worthless, at least to that user.

What does a cloud feel like?

 “What do you think a cloud feels like?” I asked the assembled Brownies

“Cotton wool, cotton candy, fluffy, cool, wet ….”

A simple garden pond decoration that produces mist by forcing water through a very fine mesh, combined with a large shallow bowl of water, creates a cloud for children to feel. Most of them end up slightly disappointed as a cloud feels like nothing very much, but it is a good conversation starter!

Have you ever had that sinking feeling?

At 1039 GMT on 7 December 1972 Jack Schmitt from the crew of Apollo 17 took one of the most iconic, and certainly most reproduced photographs of all time.  NASA named it photograph AS17-148-22727, but very shortly after the picture went public it became known as ‘the blue marble’.  It is of course the picture of the near full-earth disk taken on route to the moon, with the sun directly behind the Apollo 17 spacecraft.  Interestingly it was not the first of these kinds of images from of earth.