Weather Facts

Haboob, Sandstorm or Dust Storm?

Haboob was originally the name for a dust or sandstorm in the northern part of the Sudan, most commonly observed between May and September during the afternoon and evening. The name is derived from the Arabian word ‘habb’ meaning ‘to blow’ and has been used by the meteorological community for almost 100 years. Back in 1925, a paper titled “Haboobs” was published in the Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society.

What causes Lightning? theWeather Club Wed, 17/06/2020 - 09:31

Many parts of Europe have experienced thunderstorms this week with some fantastic lightning displays. A beautiful and deadly natural phenomenon, lightning is simply a sudden, electrostatic discharge - a ‘spark’ or ‘flash’ as charged regions in the atmosphere temporarily equalise themselves through this discharge. 

Convective Storms theWeather Club Wed, 10/06/2020 - 16:35

Convective storms or Thunderstorms, as they are more commonly referred to in the UK, are severe local storms associated with thunder, lightning, heavy rain, hail, strong winds and sudden changes in temperature. They can occur all year round but are most common during the summer months.

Rainbows - How Are They Formed?

Over the last couple of months, you may have noticed rainbows appearing frequently on social media and in your local neighbourhood. At the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic in the UK, children were encouraged by their schools and preschools to paint rainbows and display them at home on their windows as a message of hope and solidarity during uncertain times.

 

Rainclouds and carved pumpkins, Part 2 – Where is the driest place in Scotland and Northern Ireland at Halloween?

But how about Scotland and Northern Ireland? Well, grab your broom and cauldron, because we’re doing another flyby to the Met Office Hadley Centre to see what the data says. This time we’ll look at four different regions:

Rainclouds and carved pumpkins, Part 1 – Where is the driest place in the England and Wales in Halloween?

For people that put a lot of effort into their fancy dress, a rainy Halloween can mean nothing short of a disaster. What are you going to do with all that running face paint!? Knowing how wet a given Halloween could be might help you to plan your evening. Should your fancy dress include a trusty pair of wellies? We took a deep (spooky) dive into the data offered by the Met Office Hadley Centre to find out.

Is the early May Bank Holiday weekend always a wash-out?

It may be an age-old gripe that it always rains on a bank holiday, but just how close to the truth is this. With the early May bank holiday approaching, we take a look at how the UK has faired during this particular bank holiday. Although May Day celebrations in England have taken place for centuries, the early May Day Bank Holiday – on the first Monday in May – has only been in existence since 1978. How many times has this bank holiday weekend been a washout or provided wall-to-wall blue skies and warm sunshine?