Climate

Head in the Clouds

Dr Jo Elworthy is Director of Interpretation at the Eden Project. Jo has worked at Eden since its inception and is dedicated to sharing the amazing workings of our planet Earth with Eden’s visitors: ‘Visiting the rainforest and experiencing weather and finding out about the relationship between rainforests and climate first hand can help transform our understanding of our world and how we interact with it.’ Here, Jo takes us on a journey to ‘The Weather Maker’ in the Rainforest Biome at the Eden Project.

FREE Online Weather Course: Come Rain of Shine

The Royal Meteorological Society is again running a FREE online FutureLearn course, “Come Rain or Shine” on 19th June!

This free, online course has been developed jointly with University of Reading and will run for 3 weeks, although participants are free to work through it at their own pace – including after the finish date. This course is perfect for anyone who would like to brush up their understanding of our weather.

Spinning up enthusiasm for meteorology

Tornadoes. A climate view of tornadoes. Possibly the hardest brief yet. There is very little that is certain about climate change and tornadoes. When and where a tornado outbreak in the US occurs is predominantly determined by weather patterns that bring together the warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico and the cold dry air from the North. Because these weather patterns are very variable from year to year, it is hard to establish any long term effect of climate change.

WMO release State of Global Climate in 2016 report - multiple records broken

The WMO have today released their State of Global Climate in 2016 report, detailing a record global temperature, exceptionally low sea ice, continued sea level rise and increasing ocean temperatures, with extreme weather and climate continuing into 2017.

The authoritative annual statement is based on several international datasets maintained independently by global climate analysis centres, as well as research institutes and national meteorological and hydrological centres.

Dreaming of a white Christmas

Now it’s December, one of the questions we are often asked as meteorologists is “Will it be a white Christmas?” The first thing to clarify, is what exactly is being asked – do you want to know if anywhere in the UK will see a single snow flake or are you envisaging streets and roofs with a dusting of the white stuff when you wake up on 25 December.