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Weak La Niña may develop

The latest Update from the World Meteorological Organization indicates that weak La Niña conditions may develop (50-55% probability) in the next few months for the second consecutive year, influencing global weather.

La Niña, also known as a ‘cold event’, refers to the large-scale cooling of the ocean surface temperatures in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific along with changes in the tropical atmospheric circulation.

Come Rain or Shine: FREE online course

The RMetS' FutureLearn course, developed with the University of Reading, ‘Come Rain or Shine: Understanding the weather’, is now in its second year, and continues to be run three times a year.

Developed from the course we offer to secondary geography teachers, 'Come Rain or Shine' helps people to further understand the physical processes behind the weather. The stand-alone course complements the ‘Learn About Weather’ course, but you do not need to have completed that course before signing up for ‘Come Rain or Shine’.

Hurricane Maria devastates Dominica and knocks out Puerto Rico theWeather Club Tue, 19/09/2017 - 10:07

Dominica, an island in the Caribbean, was devastated by Hurricane Maria, which made landfall overnight on 18th September. Maria then went on to hit the southernmost Virgin Islands and completely took out Puerto Rico's energy grid, which could take months to fix.

Storm Aileen first named storm of 2017/18 storm season

Storm Aileen is the first storm to be named this season. It is expected to bring strong winds to central parts of the UK on Tuesday 12th and Wednesday 13th September. An Amber Warning is in place for strong winds with gusts of 55-65 mph in particular across parts of Cheshire, Lancashire, Derbyshire, Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire.  

Hurricane Irma: One of the most powerful Atlantic Ocean storms on record

On Tuesday 5th September, Hurricane Irma grew into one of the Atlantic's most powerful storms. The category 5 hurricane - highest category storm on the Saffir-Simpson scale (a commonly used scale that attempts to measure potential property damage from storm winds) - had wind speeds around 185 mph, matching those of Wilma in 2005 which killed 87 people, costing billions in damage. As it moved through the Caribbean and towards southern Florida, Irma sustained winds of 185 mph for 37 hrs, making it the longest on record any tropical cyclone around the world has maintained this intensity.