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A traveller’s guide to Reykjavík

Reykjavík is a popular winter destination for many Europeans, mainly because of the prospect of seeing the Northern Lights. Surprisingly, however, you should always take a swimwear with you when visiting the capital of Iceland in the winter months, so that you can enjoy the many health benefits from the geothermal hot springs in the area. The steam arising from the hot springs and geysers gave Reykjavík its name, which loosely translates to the Bay of Smokes.  

Human Side of the IPCC report : Human Side of the IPCC report

This term I am rewriting my climate change lectures. Not because the fundamentals have changed, but because the first part of the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was released in September. The IPCC was founded 25 years ago to provide authoritative assessments on the emerging problem of climate change. The first report was published in 1990, and the follow-ups, roughly one every six years, have grown in volume, complexity and indeed stature alongside our growing realisation of the complexity of the climate system.

FedEx Meteorologists Deliver… Rain or Shine

Depending on where you are in the world, the holiday season often delivers its own unwanted gift-rough weather.  It’s the kind of weather that doesn’t just cause your car to skid, rather shuts down roads, leaves you stranded at airports, disrupts large-scale global business, can cost billions of dollars in damages, and sadly, can even cost lives.

Feeling Under Pressure?: What are barometers?

We tend to think that the air around us doesn’t weigh anything, but in fact a cubic metre of air weighs over a kilogram. This air presses down on the Earth’s surface exerting a force we call air pressure. And if you add all those cubic metres of air sitting above our heads, it roughly equates to the force of an elephant balancing on a desk! This is equivalent to 1000 hectopascals (hPa), which is the unit used by meteorologists.

Great British Storms: British storms captured in literature and some that shaped weather forecasting as we know today.

Throughout our history there have been numerous storms to batter British shores. We take a look at some of those captured in literature and some that shaped weather forecasting as we know today.

Let’s start with the Great Storm of 1703, arguably the worst storm in British history and sometimes referred to as ‘The Channel Storm’. It started on 24th November and did not die down until 2nd December 1703, with winds reaching 120mph during the peak of the storm.