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theWeather Club photographic competition results: Our favourite weather images submitted by members!

Winner (above)

Neil Lofthouse: Triple rainbow in Iceland

Runners up:

Neil Lofthouse: Stationary standing wave to lee of Icelandic mountain

 

Roger Williams: Sunset in Tobago

 

Roger Williams: Rainbow in Tobago

 

Chris Richards: Winter sunshine on snow, Nicky Nook above Scorton, Lancs

 

Chris Richards: Thick Rime accretion on fencing on Shining Tor ridge, Derbyshire

 

Graham Bishop: Cold Air 25/12/2010 near Minster Lovell, Oxfordshire

 

Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation

Generalised model of thermohaline circulation, adapted from NASA.

The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is a system of currents in the Atlantic Ocean, including the Gulf Stream that circulates a vast amount of heat from the tropics towards the North Pole disseminating the cold, saline, dense waters towards the Tropics and even further south towards the South Pole. The figure above captures that in a generalised worldwide model of thermohaline (thermo- referring to temperature and –haline referring to salt content) circulation.

The Paul Hudson Weather Show

Paul Hudson in the BBC studio during the Weather Show

In the time I’ve worked at the BBC I’ve made programmes about American blues musicians performing in the former Soviet Union, young offenders being rehabilitated through the arts, Royal Navy convoys protecting NATO peace conferences. I’ve interviewed high profile recording artists, read news bulletins and reported live on breaking news stories. And whatever the inherent difficulties of these assignments were, they were at least tangible and there were facts - a story to tell.

World Meteorological Day: World Meteorological Day is a yearly event, celebrated on 23 March.

World Meteorological Day is a yearly event, celebrated on 23 March. It commemorates the the entry into force in 1950 of the convention that created the World Meteorological Organization. The day also highlights the huge contribution that National Meteorological and Hydrological Services make to the safety and well-being of society.

This year's World Meteorological Day theme is “Weather and climate: engaging youth.""

The following resources are available for supporting World Meteorological Day celebrations around the world:

Measuring Wind Speed : What is anemometer?

Wind is simply movement of air, but sometimes this movement can be pretty fast! Those of us in the South of England have recent memories of the St Jude’s Day storm on 28 October, and the disruption caused by gusts of up to 99mph. As well as meteorologists, lots of other people are interested in how fast the wind is blowing, ranging from sportsmen such as parachutists and sailors, to those concerned with hazardous winds, such as air traffic controllers and crane operators. But how do we measure its speed?

Winds of Change

Image: Some of the local wind names and their location. 

In many areas of the world, regional conditions give rise to winds that have been identified by the locals as having a special effect or occurring during a particular season. Quite often these winds are given a name by local inhabitants.