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Ted Baker Interview with Dr Catherine Muller

tWC Editor, Dr Catherine Muller, was recently interviewed for a special edition newspaper which will be handed out in the Ted Baker Store in Heathrow Terminal 3 to mark the launch of their new weather-themed store decor. Here’s what she had to say:

Q. Can you tell us a little about you, your position at the Royal Meteorological Society, and how you got there?

Aurora

Taking its name from the Latin for dawn, aurora is the phenomenon of visible light being emitted by the high atmosphere, caused when charged particles emitted by the sun are deflected by the Earth’s permanent magnetic field. In Britain, aurora usually appears as a grey-white glow on the northern horizon. The terms ‘aurora borealis’ (or northern lights) and ‘aurora australis’ (or southern lights) are applied to the occurrence of aurora in the northern and southern hemispheres respectively.

Climate change panel discussion at RHS Chatsworth Flower Show this Saturday

A panel discussion about climate change will take place at RHS Chatsworth Flower Show, which runs 7th-11th June. The panel discussion will take place in the Garden Theatre at 2pm on Saturday 10th June and will be Chaired by Peter Gibbs, Fellow of the Royal Meteorological Society. Other panel members include: 

Man mowing lawn defies twister in Alberta, Canada

A photograph of a man mowing his lawn with an ominous tornado spinning in the background has been doing the rounds on social media this week - it even made BBC news

Mr Theunis Wessels, from Alberta, Canada said he was very aware of the twister which was about one and a quarter miles from their house, but "wasn't worried at all" – unlike his daughter, who was quite concerned by her father’s nonchalance.

Anniversary of D-Day Forecast by James Stagg

Perhaps one of the most important weather forecasts ever made was the one for D-Day, the Allied invasion of France.

For the Allied invasion to have any chance of success, General Eisenhower – Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces - needed a full moon, a low tide, little cloud cover, light winds, and low seas. The low tide was necessary to allow soldiers to see, avoid, and disarm the mined obstacles. During June 1944 a full moon and low tide coincided on 5, 6 and 7 June. The invasion of France had been scheduled for June 5, 1944.

FREE Online Weather Course: Come Rain of Shine

The Royal Meteorological Society is again running a FREE online FutureLearn course, “Come Rain or Shine” on 19th June!

This free, online course has been developed jointly with University of Reading and will run for 3 weeks, although participants are free to work through it at their own pace – including after the finish date. This course is perfect for anyone who would like to brush up their understanding of our weather.

Summer is on its way

High pressure will build through the middle of this week meaning there will be lots of fine and dry weather about, though initially cloud will feed in from the west bringing a little drizzle in the north and west. As the high moves away on Thursday air from the south will move in turning things increasingly sunnier and warmer by the end of the week with highs of 28-29degC even possible in some parts.

Let's hope things stay sunny for the bank holiday!