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On the road: Early starts, Eammon Holmes and some very young meteorologists

The Great British Weather Experiment got into full swing today with the start of our tour around Britain in Daphne, the VW campervan. Daphne is becoming more famous than theWeather Club, as people admire her sleek blue interior and ask me about the size of her engine. Who can complain, though, as she glides us from one location to next, as we visit 16 cities in the next 8 days.

Violent floods cause devastation around the world

A two-week period in June saw a rash of violent flooding across four different continents. In the early morning of Friday 11th June, 20 people were killed after heavy rain in Arkansas, USA, saw water levels in the Little Missouri river rise at up to 2.4m per hour, causing a wall of water to tear through busy campsites at the Ouachita National Forest. On 15th June it was the turn of the French Riviera to suffer under a deluge, when the region experienced its worst flooding since 1827.

Cold snap wreaks havoc on African penguin population

The cold snap that hit South Africa in June, leading to incessant moaning from English football commentators who had failed to pack appropriately for the World Cup, had a far more malign impact on the nation's wildlife than it did on its showpiece sporting event. Around 600 African penguins, already an endangered species, were killed by the icy temperatures, heavy rain and significant wind chill over a two day period in mid-June on Bird Island, Algoa Bay in Eastern Cape province. The victims were mainly young chicks whose downy feathers provide scant protection against the elements.

Ugandan ice cap splits

Officials from the Ugandan Wildlife Authority have revealed that rising temperatures have caused the ice cap on the country's highest peak to split, blocking access to the summit of Mt Margherita – the third highest spot in Africa. The mountain is located in the Rwenzori mountain range – a place of great natural beauty which was declared a Unesco World Heritage site in 1994. Rwenzori is one of the few places near the equator where glacial ice can be found, but while the ice cap covered 6 sq km just 50 years ago, it now measures less than 1 sq km.