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Mare's Tail

The name given to thin, wispy cirrus clouds (Cirrus uncinus) composed of fibrous ice crystals that are blown by strong winds high in the atmosphere and point in the direction of the air movement.  They often appear as strands resembling a horse's tail or 'curly hooks'.

Temperature extremes in your garden

Taking temperature measurements in your garden is a great way to start investigating microclimates. We take a look at some maximum-minimum thermometers on the market.

Just how cold did it get last night and how hot will it be this afternoon? You can measure these daily extreme temperatures in your own garden using a maximum-minimum thermometer. A variety of thermometers are available in high street stores, garden centres and online, ranging from the traditional to the hi-tech.

Microclimates in the garden

Every garden has a number of different microclimates, and these have an effect on not only the temperature but also the amount of rainfall and wind strength. Even within a small garden, there can be large differences in conditions. If you have been digging or weeding your garden for a while, you will probably have discovered hot, dry corners and cold, draughty spaces. Understanding the microclimates in your garden really gives you a head start. Most gardeners want light and shade, dry and damp, sheltered and exposed areas in which to grow different plants and create contrasting spaces.

Met Office release ‘State of the UK Climate 2016’ report

The Met Office have released their 3rd annual State of the UK Climate report, which is an annual publication providing an up-to-date assessment of UK climate trends, variations and extremes based on the latest available climate quality observational datasets.

The report shows that 2016 was the 13th warmest year in records dating back to 1910. For the UK as a whole, 2016 was 0.5ºC warmer than average (1981-2010), whilst the last decade was 0.3ºC warmer and sunshine levels were 4% higher.

Fujiwhara

The Fujiwhara effect describes the rotation of two nearby - within about 1,200km - storms around each other and a common midpoint (anti-clockwise in the northern hemisphere).

The Fujiwhara effect was named after Sakuhei Fujiwhara, who described a paper about symmetrical motions in the atmosphere in 1921