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FREE Online Weather Course: Come Rain of Shine

The Royal Meteorological Society is again running a FREE online FutureLearn course, “Come Rain or Shine” on 19th June!

This free, online course has been developed jointly with University of Reading and will run for 3 weeks, although participants are free to work through it at their own pace – including after the finish date. This course is perfect for anyone who would like to brush up their understanding of our weather.

Summer is on its way

High pressure will build through the middle of this week meaning there will be lots of fine and dry weather about, though initially cloud will feed in from the west bringing a little drizzle in the north and west. As the high moves away on Thursday air from the south will move in turning things increasingly sunnier and warmer by the end of the week with highs of 28-29degC even possible in some parts.

Let's hope things stay sunny for the bank holiday!

Year of Polar Prediction launched

The Year of Polar Prediction has been launched and will take place from mid-2017 to mid-2019 (covering an entire year in both the Arctic and Antarctic). It is a concerted international campaign to improve predictions of weather, climate and ice conditions in the Arctic and Antarctic, in order to minimize the environmental risks, maximize the opportunities associated with rapid climate change in polar regions and to close the current gaps in polar forecasting capacity.

Study explains science behind newly recognised cloud

Clouds have always appeared in paintings, photographs and pictures, but images captured by amateur photographers confirmed the existence of a dramatic cloud form with a roughened, wavelike base. Citizen science has now helped experts to explain how the newly-recognised ‘wave-like’ asperitas cloud is formed.  

A newly discovered atmospheric optical phenomenon called… Steve

Image: 'Steve' (Source: ESA - Dave Markel)

If Boaty McBoatface is anything to go by, social media has a lot to answer for when it comes to naming things for science. The most recent example of this is Steve; a recently discovered phenomenon all thanks to the power of social media and citizen scientists – something that wouldn’t have been possible 20 years ago. 

Mother-of-Pearl clouds thought to have inspired Edvard Munch's 'The Scream'

Research published in the Royal Meteorological Society's Weather journal suggesting that mother-of-pearl clouds inspired Edvard Munch's 'The Scream' has gained lots of attention at #EGU17 conference in Vienna. It was even featured on BBC News >> 

Read the full Weather article for free here >> 

Spinning up enthusiasm for meteorology

Tornadoes. A climate view of tornadoes. Possibly the hardest brief yet. There is very little that is certain about climate change and tornadoes. When and where a tornado outbreak in the US occurs is predominantly determined by weather patterns that bring together the warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico and the cold dry air from the North. Because these weather patterns are very variable from year to year, it is hard to establish any long term effect of climate change.