Weather Applications

Book review: Weather in 30 seconds

By Dr. Jen Green and Prof Adam Scaife, 
Ivy Kids, £9.99, Publication date: 2015, 96 pages, 
Recommended age range: 8-14 

A lovely short book, with short, accurate explanations, including ideas for simple experiments and calculations to demonstrate atmospheric processes, plus some helpful illustrations. It was a great idea to put a glossary at the start of each section.

theWeather Club photographic competition results: Our favourite weather images submitted by members!

Winner (above)

Neil Lofthouse: Triple rainbow in Iceland

Runners up:

Neil Lofthouse: Stationary standing wave to lee of Icelandic mountain

 

Roger Williams: Sunset in Tobago

 

Roger Williams: Rainbow in Tobago

 

Chris Richards: Winter sunshine on snow, Nicky Nook above Scorton, Lancs

 

Chris Richards: Thick Rime accretion on fencing on Shining Tor ridge, Derbyshire

 

Graham Bishop: Cold Air 25/12/2010 near Minster Lovell, Oxfordshire

 

World Meteorological Day: World Meteorological Day is a yearly event, celebrated on 23 March.

World Meteorological Day is a yearly event, celebrated on 23 March. It commemorates the the entry into force in 1950 of the convention that created the World Meteorological Organization. The day also highlights the huge contribution that National Meteorological and Hydrological Services make to the safety and well-being of society.

This year's World Meteorological Day theme is “Weather and climate: engaging youth.""

The following resources are available for supporting World Meteorological Day celebrations around the world:

Human Side of the IPCC report : Human Side of the IPCC report

This term I am rewriting my climate change lectures. Not because the fundamentals have changed, but because the first part of the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was released in September. The IPCC was founded 25 years ago to provide authoritative assessments on the emerging problem of climate change. The first report was published in 1990, and the follow-ups, roughly one every six years, have grown in volume, complexity and indeed stature alongside our growing realisation of the complexity of the climate system.

Great British Storms: British storms captured in literature and some that shaped weather forecasting as we know today.

Throughout our history there have been numerous storms to batter British shores. We take a look at some of those captured in literature and some that shaped weather forecasting as we know today.

Let’s start with the Great Storm of 1703, arguably the worst storm in British history and sometimes referred to as ‘The Channel Storm’. It started on 24th November and did not die down until 2nd December 1703, with winds reaching 120mph during the peak of the storm.