Weather Applications

Biometeorology: Weather and Health

Biometeorology is the study of the impact weather has on the natural world, including animals, plants and humans. This includes the impact on symptoms of existing diseases, contribution to new conditions and temporary physiological changes. There are a number of illnesses and symptoms that are caused or exacerbated by certain types of weather. Here we discuss some of the more obvious conditions, as well as some, perhaps, more surprising ailments.

British hay fever maps

Hay fever maps have been produced to help sufferers identify ‘hotspots’ that should be avoided. The map locates plants that can trigger hay fever or asthma attacks across Britain. It is hoped the map will help sufferers make decisions about where to live, work or visit at certain times, by also identifying the peak times when pollen is released. The researchers from University of Exeter, the Met Office and NERC’s Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, examined 12 key plant species that are associated with hay fever and asthma and mapped the data across Britain.

Spinning up enthusiasm for meteorology

Tornadoes. A climate view of tornadoes. Possibly the hardest brief yet. There is very little that is certain about climate change and tornadoes. When and where a tornado outbreak in the US occurs is predominantly determined by weather patterns that bring together the warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico and the cold dry air from the North. Because these weather patterns are very variable from year to year, it is hard to establish any long term effect of climate change.

Weather and energy trading

It is no secret that the weather and energy consumption have always been intrinsically linked.  The basic theories of supply and demand drive a lot of the relationship – if the weather is very cold we will demand more power and knowing what the weather might do months, seasons or even years ahead will help shape predictions on how much power we need to generate. But weather is just one factor that effects our power requirements and prices, and until recently, other core factors like UK politics, geopolitical events, the economy, etc.

Book review: 30-second Meteorology

Photo: 30-second Meteorology - The 50 most significant events and phenomena, each explained in half a minute. Editor: Adam A. Scaife, Foreword by Julia Slingo. 
Publishers: Ivy Press (2016). £14.99

This is a beautiful and tactile coffee table book, whilst being a handier size than most coffee table books. It consists of seven sections; 1) the elements, 2) the global atmosphere, 3) the Sun, 4) weather watching and forecasting, 5) can we change the weather, 6) weather cycles and 7) extreme weather.